Lean and Green Services

Mtech’s Lean “implementation” sessions are typically presented as part of an improvement project, but can be presented as stand-alone training if requested. Following is a list of the implementation or “Lean tools” training which Mtech provides. Please contact Dave Rizzardo, 410-916-3230, Mtech’s Lean Services Manager for further information or to schedule a visit to discuss your company’s Lean training and implementation needs.

  • Value Stream Mapping
  • The 5S System
  • Setup Reduction
  • Cellular/Flow Manufacturing
  • Pull Systems/Kanban
  • Total Productive Maintenance
  • Mistake-Proofing
  • Standard Work
  • Idea System Design
  • Fundamental Quality Tools of Lean Six Sigma

VALUE STREAM MAPPING

Value Stream Mapping (VSM) is an analysis and planning tool where a cross-functional team jointly determines where the greatest opportunities are within the material and information flow for a particular value stream. The planning and prioritization of these opportunities serves as the implementation plan for the improvement strategy. Mtech has worked with clients utilizing the VSM process in analyzing not only their primary product and information flows, but also their support flows in administrative areas such as the quotation process, capital appropriations process, the hiring process, and financial processes. Please contact Dave Rizzardo, daver@umd.edu, 410-916-3230, Mtech’s Lean Services Manager for further information or to schedule a visit to discuss your company’s Lean training and implementation needs. Following is Mtech’s VSM process.

  1. Review project scope and baseline information.
    • Value Stream analysis boundaries, customer, supplier
    • Goals and objectives
    • Customer demand
    • Measurements
    • Baseline data
  2. Document and analyze utilizing Value Stream Mapping. (Other \mapping tools/techniques are utilized as needed.)
    • Draw current state
    • Brainstorm improvement opportunities
    • Create action items
    • Draw future state
    • Estimate improvements
  3. Create ongoing measurement and continuous improvement plan.
  4. Prioritize action items, assign responsibilities, develop implementation plan.
  5. Determine follow-up plan to monitor progress.

THE 5S SYSTEM

The 5S process is a critical component of a successful Lean manufacturing strategy and is a component of all Lean improvement efforts. The intent of 5S is to have only what you need in the workplace, a designated place for everything in a clean and safe workplace, a standard way of doing things, and the discipline to maintain it. This will result in improved efficiency, quality, and workplace control; and therefore, reduced waste and cost. Mtech’s 5S experience includes assisting companies in discrete, process, and project-based organizations. Please contact Dave Rizzardo, daver@umd.edu, 410-916-3230, Mtech’s Lean Services Manager for further information or to schedule a visit to discuss your company’s Lean training and implementation needs. Following are the 5S Process steps and Mtech’s implementation process.

  1. Sort – Separate the needed from the not needed. Remove everything not needed from the work area.
    • A brief review of Lean concepts and the 5S process are provided by Mtech.
    • The team documents the current condition, identifies priorities, and prepares for the Sort step of the process.
    • Sort process implementation steps are reviewed.
    • The Sort process is conducted in the work area(s).
  2. Set In Order – “A place for everything and everything in its place.”
    • The Set in Order step of the 5S process is reviewed.
    • The team determines locations and identifies methods for material, tools, and information.
    • The floor layout is analyzed during this step.
    • Set in Order activities are conducted in the work area(s).
    • Any Set In Order activities not completed will be documented on the Actions List. (Some items may need to be purchased or fabricated; thus, will need to be completed following the initial project. Also, major equipment relocation would likely be a follow-up item.)
  3. Shine – Clean all tools and equipment. Inspect while cleaning. Identify potential problems.
    • The Shine step of the 5S process is reviewed.
    • Shine activities are completed and follow-up items will be planned and documented on the Actions List.
  4. Standardize – Create the rules for maintaining and controlling the first 3S’s and use visual controls. The Standardize step of the 5S process isreviewed and related action items determined.
  5. Sustain – Ensure adherence to the 5S standards through communication, training, and self-discipline.
    • The Sustain step of the 5S process is reviewed and related action items determined.
    • The implementation status is reviewed and the Action Item list updated.
    • The 5S auditing and measuring plan is reviewed.

SETUP REDUCTION

In today’s highly competitive environment, setup reduction is a critical component of a successful Lean manufacturing strategy. Setup Reduction builds on the principles of the Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED) System, developed by Shigeo Shingo, to dramatically reduce changeover times. Some of the key benefits of reducing setup times are reduced inventory levels and lead times, increased capacity, improved flexibility, and increased productivity.

Mtech has setup reduction experience in a variety of industries, and results are typically a reduction of changeover times of 50% or more. The recommended project schedule depends on the specifics of the equipment and current length of setup times; however, shown below is Mtech’s setup reduction process for a 3-day kaizen event. Please contact Dave Rizzardo, daver@umd.edu, 410-916-3230, Mtech’s Lean Services Manager for further information or to schedule a visit to discuss your company’s Lean training and implementation needs.

Day 1

  • Training - Quick Changeover
  • Videotape the current changeover
  • Review videotape and document changeover steps and times
  • Brainstorm - Convert Internal to External
  • Develop Actions List

Day 2

  • Brainstorm - Streamline Internal
  • Balance Labor for Internal Elements – Develop Draft S.O.P.
  • Streamline External
  • Develop Draft S.O.P.s
    • Changeover Internal and External S.O.P. and/or Checklists
    • 5S S.O.P. and/or Checklist
  • Discuss Scheduling Options
  • Determine Visual Measurement Methods
  • Update Actions List

Day 3

  • Train on New Changeover Procedure
  • Implement New Changeover Process
  • Videotape New Changeover Process
  • Review Videotape
  • Revise/Adjust/Monitor
  • Update Actions List

Follow Up

  • Complete Action Items
  • Revise/Adjust/Monitor

CELLULAR/FLOW MANUFACTURING

Cellular/Flow Manufacturing is the linking of manual and machine operations into the most efficient combination of resources to maximize value-added content while minimizing waste. The most efficient combination implies the concept of process balancing. Only in a balanced process will the product continually flow. As a result, parts movement is minimized, wait time between operations is reduced, inventory is reduced, and productivity increases.

Mtech’s experience ranges from assisting companies in developing cells in varied discrete part industries such medical device assembly and machine build processing, to developing a cellular approach in extremely low volume, high mix, job shop environments such as printed membrane switch processing. Please contact Dave Rizzardo, 410-916-3230, Mtech’s Lean Services Manager for further information or to schedule a visit to discuss your company’s Lean training and implementation needs. Following is Mtech’s cellular analysis and design process.

  1. Group Products into Families
  2. Gather baseline data
    • Determine takt time(s)
    • Document labor content
  3. Determine number of Operators and Equipment required
  4. Combine work elements to balance the process
  5. Design Cell layout – Material, people, and information flows
    • U-Shape if possible
    • POUS (Point of Use Storage) for tools, materials, and information
    • Apply visual controls
    • Consider replenishment system for hardware/components
    • Design for flexibility for different staffing levels
  6. Implement the Cell design
  7. Monitor the assembly process and adjust the cell design as needed
  8. Document open action items for follow-up

 

 

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